Digital Displays

We have long been on the cutting-edge of technology. As early as 2004, we were using interactive programmed lighting in our Donor Walls, starting with an award-winning project at Columbus Children's Research Institute.

In that project, a computer-driven LED lighting system used interactive and progressively pulsing light initiated by and following the flow of foot traffic in the lobby. We also program changes in color and pattern of the lighting to interact with the gestures and proximity of passersby.

Now we have added digital displays to our repertoire, using this technology to create fresh, artistic, and fascinating displays for Donor Recognition, History and Heritage Walls, and other kinds of digital and programmed displays and room experiences.

Boston Children's Hospital

Our digital Donor Wall at Boston Children's Hospital is a first-of-its kind combination of our classic atrisan-carved crystal Lifetime Donor Plaques with a luminous, leading-edge digital LCD display of annual Donor Names on an interactive storybook background, custom-designed by us with collaboration by acclaimed children's book illustrator Elly MacKay. The digital "magic" was the work of Tim Feldman, our longtime engineer and technology collaborator. The crystal plaques are held in place by our 18 foot long curved, glowing Corian architectural surround. This creates a delightful “puppet-theater” type experience for families.

Part of our design intent was to create a state-of-the-art Donor Wall that would mirror Boston Children's forward-thinking advances in technology while retaining their long-established tradition of child-sensitive, compassionate care. The result was an entirely new kind of Donor Recognition: permanent but changeable; modern yet reassuringly traditional, sophisticated yet child-friendly.

Winner of a prestigious Nightingale Gold Award for Architectural Products in the healthcare environment. Nightingale awards go to “companies whose product design and innovation are shown to improve quality of care and contribute to patient healing.”

For more on this project:

Watch a short overview video